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African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i
African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i
African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i
African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i
African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i
African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)-i

African eggplant

Scientific name
Solanum macrocarpon

Basic Information

Solanaceae Family Solanum Genus African eggplant Species
Solanaceae > Solanum > Solanum macrocarpon
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  • Flower
  • Forb/herb
  • Fruit
  • Perennial
  • Shrub
  • Vegetable
Height
100cm ~
Flower Color
Leaf Color
Anthesis
summer
Sunlight Exposure
Full Sun
Hardiness Zones
10
Cold resistance
Poor
Heat resistance
Excellent
Habitat of origin
Africa
Growth Rate
Fast

What is African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)?

What is African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

The perennial herbaceous vine, called the African eggplant's scientific name: Solanum macrocarpon, belongs to the nightshade family. This West African native plant has lobed green leaves covered in hairs and grows up to two meters tall. Its star-shaped flowers come in white, purple and yellow shades depending on the cultivar. Ranging up to twenty centimeters long when mature, the elongated berry fruit transforms from green to orange or yellow when ripe. Valuable for its rich flavor, culinary dishes commonly include the African eggplant. With proper drainage and sunlight, it grows well in tropical and subtropical areas, tolerating varying temperatures. The nutritional content and resilience of the African eggplant make it an important crop.

DaisyDawn
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Flower meaning

The scientific name for the African eggplant is Solanum aethiopicum. This plant is cultivated chiefly for its edible fruit, not its flowers. In America, the African eggplant has no special meaning in the language of flowers. Flower symbolism varies between cultures and eras. Generally it applies to particular blooms rather than whole plants. As a plant taxonomist for over a decade, I know flower meanings can differ across countries. The African eggplant lacks a set flower symbolism in America since it is grown for food. In the language of flowers, meanings relate to individual flowers more than total plants. So this eggplant does not represent anything specific through its blossoms in the American flower language.

DaisyDawn
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Calendar of African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

Calendar

African eggplant, also known as Solanum aethiopicum, belongs in the flowering family Solanaceae. The blooming period in America lasts a few summer months, from June until August. Vibrant colors and shapes characterize the flowers when they look their best. Blooming lasts several weeks, with each flower lasting a couple days before wilting. To prolong blooming, give enough light, water, and food. Also, removing dead flowers helps more flowers grow. But flowering time and length depends on the type grown and conditions. In the United States, the flowering time of African eggplant typically occurs during the summer months, specifically from June to August. During this period, the flowers of African eggplant are at their best, showcasing their vibrant colors and unique shapes. The blooming time of African eggplant usually lasts for several weeks, with individual flowers blooming for a few days before wilting. To ensure a longer blooming period, it is recommended to provide African eggplant with adequate sunlight, water, and nutrients. Additionally, deadheading, which involves removing faded flowers, can promote continuous blooming. However, it is important to note that specific blooming times and durations may vary depending on the specific cultivar and growing conditions.

DaisyDawn
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How to grow African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

Watering

The watering frequency and technique for the Solanum aethiopicum differs based on the seasonality and soil conditions. One or two deep irrigations per week are optimal when actively growing in the spring and summer, but less frequent when dormant in fall and winter. Moist but not saturated soil is ideal. Quantities fluctuate with temperature, humidity and soil variety, but around one inch of water weekly suffices during the growing season. However, allow the earth to partially dry between irrigations when resting to avert root putrefaction. Observing moisture levels and modifying watering accordingly is essential for the wellness and yield of the plant.

DaisyDawn
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Soil and Fertilizer

The tropical plant Solanum aethiopicum flourishes in properly drained loam or sandy earth that is nutrient-rich and can retain water well. For new plants, spreading 1-2 tablespoons of balanced fertilizer around the base every 4-6 weeks aids growth. Test soil routinely and apply more fertilizer as needed every 6-8 weeks once established. Prevent root scorch by watering after fertilizing. Remember to check manufacturer guidelines and evenly distribute fertilizer without contacting the stem directly.

DaisyDawn
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Sunlight and Place

The perennial plant Solanum aethiopicum, known scientifically as African eggplant, flourishes with full daylight for best progress. Possessing high cold and heat endurance, it thrives in diverse weather conditions. Ideal growth happens between 60 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit, optimally 70 to 80. Hot summers necessitate shaded respite from intense warmth. Colder areas enable overwintering inside or cultivating as an annual. When transplanting, allow a minimum of six to eight direct sunlight hours daily. This adequately fuels photosynthesis, the crucial mechanism for development. Ultimately, its resilience to assorted sunlight levels makes African eggplant a flexible gardening selection.

DaisyDawn
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Advanced Information of African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

Pruning

The optimum time for pruning the Solanum aethiopicum, familiarly called African eggplants, arrives in the initial period of spring. Start this undertaking by eliminating any withered branches or those injured, making the cut at vigorous cells. Afterwards, ventilate dense zones through selectively getting rid of offshoots. To regulate the plant's dimensions, cut lengthy or gangling shoots close to a robust bud or side branch. Subsequent to pruning, decontaminate and sanitize the cutting tools to stop diseases from spreading. Think about supplementing a balanced plant food to supply vital nutrients for fresh development. Habitual inspection and care will guarantee uninterrupted wellbeing and yield of the African eggplants. Cleaning and disinfecting the shears after cutting back prevents illnesses. Adding fertilizer gives important nourishment for new shoots. Regular upkeep guarantees enduring health and productivity of the plant.

DaisyDawn
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Planting and Harvest

The tropical plant Solanum aethiopicum, commonly named African eggplant, can flourish when cultivated in containers or directly in the ground. For growing African eggplant in pots, select a container with sufficient drainage openings to prevent waterlogging of roots. Partially pack the pot with a porous, fast-draining potting mixture, retaining area for the plant's root system. Carefully detach the plant from the nursery pot and situate it in the new container, confirming the top of the root ball is level with the soil. Gently return soil around the plant to fill the pot. After potting, thoroughly hydrate the plant and situate it in a spot with ample, indirect sunlight. If repotting becomes necessary once the plant outgrows its existing container or the soil becomes too compressed, choose a somewhat larger pot and repeat the same potting procedure. Inadequate care can hinder growth and health of African eggplant. Sufficient water is important, but overwatering can cause root rot. Apply a balanced fertilizer regularly to encourage healthy growth. Pruning any dead or damaged foliage keeps the plant's appearance tidy. Check for pests and diseases, and use appropriate control measures if needed. With proper care, African eggplant can prosper in a pot or planted in the ground.

DaisyDawn
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Propagation

The african eggplant, also known by Bitterball and Gboma, possesses wide-ranging propagation practices encompassing sowing fertilized ovules, bifurcating, grafting, and foliar grafts. To increase numbers by sowing seeds, assemble fully developed eggplants and extract the seeds within. Deposit the seeds in an adequately draining soil mixture, lightly covering with topsoil. Maintain dampness and situate the container in a bright and warm locale. For bifurcating, meticulously divide the organism into smaller divisions, guaranteeing each section retains roots. Embed the divisions in separate containers or directly underground, furnishing adequate hydration and sunlight. To propagate through grafting, excerpt stem grafts from vigorous plants, ensuring at minimum two nodes are present. Remove lower leaves and dip the severed end in a rooting catalyst. Embed the grafts in an adequately draining soil mixture and retain in a warm and humid climate until roots mature. Foliar grafts can also propagate. Excerpt a vigorous leaf and slice into sections, guaranteeing each section retains a vein. Embed the leaf sections in an adequately draining soil mixture, maintaining dampness and a warm locale. Reap the fruits when completely matured and attained desired magnitude and pigment.

DaisyDawn
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Pests and Diseases

The African eggplant, known as Solanum aethiopicum, encounters various insects and diseases. The fruit borer worm tunnels inside the fruit, causing wilting. Aphids feed on the sap, stunting growth. Bacterial wilt makes leaves yellow and kills the plant. Powdery white mildew coats leaves. Early blight creates dark lesions. Monitoring helps detect pests early. Remove and destroy infested plants. Introduce ladybugs to eat aphids. Use insecticidal soap sprays. Rotate crops and sanitize tools to prevent bacterial wilt spread. Space plants to discourage fungal diseases. Apply fungicides as needed. The African eggplant requires vigilance to maintain health.

DaisyDawn
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Habitat of African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

Habitat

Toxicity of African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

Health Benefits

edible
edible
Toxic
No toxicity

NO DATA

Toxic for dogs and cats

NO DATA

Q&A of African eggplant (Solanum macrocarpon)

  • What Are the Benefits of African Eggplant?

  • Is there a recommended way to choose Solanum macrocarpon?

  • How to Identify and Care for African Eggplant Leaves?